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. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in in massachusetts and the url scott brown.com -- scott brown 2012 was very purchased. with so many women have been in washington are so many years as legislatures and working on porting work and yet their names never bubbled to the top were curious, why not? >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? i mean, all three of you studied similar topics, but how did the book actually come about by >> your idea, ted. >> well, i guess it was my idea. i'd been a political nerd since i was, i don't know, my parents still remember my sister and i in 1960s staging the nixon kennedy debate with our staff animals. and during all of this years of nerd am, what i was fascinated anywhere the magazine issues that would come out way in advance of the presidential election, that would previewed the eight or 10 or 12 people who ought to be considered and that simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues in so many magazines that women were not making it. they were not been thought to be
knew. my father had found a local baker's shop where they made baked loaves of heavy brown bread. he insisted on buying them. he said it tasted better, but in my mind it was nonsense. it tasted like almost nothing. that was the point. the driver of the police car got out, opened the passenger door, told me to get in. my father rode up front. but beside the driver. the police car went slowly down the lane. the whole lane was unpaved back there. just wide enough for one car at a time, a precipitous bumpy way with sticking up from it. the whole thing ratcheted by farm equipment and time. these kids, they think it's funny to steal a car. they will be locals. i'm just glad it was found so fast. that's what my father said. there was a faraway girl with hair so blonde and her cheeks very red when we get past. i held my peace of burnt toast on my lap. >> leeson said it's a long while back anywhere from here. we passed a band in the lane and over on the side we saw a gate leading into a field in the brown mud. we drove past it. parked on the grass edge. the policeman let me out, and the three
father had found the local baker's shop where they made thick gloves of heavy brown bread. he insisted on buying them. they tasted better which was to my mind nonsense. proper bread was white and free slice and tasted like almost nothing. that was the point. the driver of the police car opened the passenger door and told me to get in. my father rode up front beside the driver. the police car went slowly down the lane. the lane with unpaved, wide enough for one car at a time. apparently, precipitous, bumpy way, the whole thing rotted by farm equipment and time. these kids think is funny to drive a car and abandon its. i am glad it was found so fast. past the farm where a small girl with hair so blonde it was almost white with red cheeks stared as we went past. a piece of burnt toast on my lap. it is a long walk back to any where from here. we passed a band in the lane and saw the white mini over on the side in front of the gate being into a field with tires sunk deep in the ground. we drove past it on the grass verge. the policeman let me out and the three of us walked over to the many.
. >> first one he's in his office in april of 1987 and he was having a meeting with brown, former defense secretary for jimmy carter and just going over parts of his program. i think brown was an informal advisor to his campaign, we're in his house office and i was just siting in -- sitting in a chair while this discussion was going on. i was listening to howard brown. >> the other one. >> this is what i call the dead tired at 5:00 p.m. shot. it's live at 5 in boston and it's that whole look of being wired up to the electronic media, getting a free spot on the news, and spelling it is what you want to tell but looking -- just waiting to go on for the green light to go on, the cameras, and he has that zombie expression on his face. >> >> and these two. >> this was in a factory in new hampshire. where he was listening to a factory worker and seemed to be impatient with it and the last photograph was taken after the faneuil hall debate. we had driven that evening from boston up to manchester in a blizzard and everybody decided, the reporters and can't date, to -- candidate to go down to the
and smarter people are. you don't have to move manufacturing to the lowest cost labor or moves to brown sites, or waste lands, but to where people live, have ideas, and have needs. it's a short r supply chain, just in time manufacturing, contact between the way things are made and consumed. it's a better ecological footprint. >> yeah. time for a last question, and i know whenever you open questions up, it's the power of the interpret and distributed anything, you have a whacky question. >> decide to end on that? >> if you don't mind. i like it a lot. i love to see this scenario. software tools on earth used by people to design cool stuff, #*d # printers on the moon, using local material, how realistic is it, and what stuff would be produced up there? >> that's star trek replicators. what you have, and member, there's a box. the box has, like, presumably feed stock of various sorts. i don't know if they were atoms or molecules. >> never specified. >> viles and goo that you say you want something, and it would just download the recipe, mix them in the right proportions, fab fabricate them in th
the observation when a male is elected to senatorship he is cast as a presidential hopeful. scott brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts and yet scottybrown2012.com was already searching but some of many women had been in washington for so many years as legislators and working on important work and yet their names never bubble to the top and we were curious why not. >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? you were citing similar topics but how does this book come about? >> it was my idea. i have been a political merde -- my parents remember my sister and i in 1960 staging a nixon/kennedy debate. my elephant beat her rabbit. during all those years, what always fascinated me were magazine issues that would come out in advance of presidential election that would preview the eighth or ten or 12 people who ought to be considered and it struck me after seeing so many issues and so many magazines that women were making it on to that. they were not thought to be presidential. they were thought not to be presidential. as an academic you ask why? that for me was the origin o
in the brown v. board of education 1964. strom thurmond is the recordholder to stay at the longest one-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population an
decision in the brown v. board of education in 1954. strom is the record holder to the day of the longest one man filibuster. in the book of record records. 2 hours and 18 minutes. he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember him today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogue. he was. he was that. he was one of the last. but when we forget about strofm he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservative. what do i mean by that? what is that? the sun belt it's one of the big stories that is the flow of jobs and resource and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest. in the older post world war ii people. they recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. receiving lots of fundings from the federal government to build military at the time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi but states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona and north carolina are being transformed in the postworld war two period by the histo
of it like lucy promising charlie brown she won't pull football? [laughter] >> yes, i think it is. i think that he has to nod to that there is no evidence he would govern in of bipartisan way to read george w. bush that is not elected president in my opinion but did not get a majority of the votes -- [applause] he ran that we as a compassionate conservative and you would have expected him to govern as a moderate and realize he presided over a very deeply divided country and instead he was one of the most radical presidents we've ever had, so i expect the same thing from mitt romney who is actually talked who is espousing more radical right policies than george w. bush ever did. like nixon and ronald reagan in certain ways looks like a moderate in terms of education mitt romney is very willing to slash all of that. >> romney brings up his massachusetts experience where he was in an overwhelmingly democratic state to show how he would govern as president. he had one term in massachusetts. a cynic and he lost interest. and let's -- was he really the governor of massachusetts? i said this on t
is cast as a future presidential hopeful. scott brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts, and that's gotbrown2012.com, it was already taken but so many women had been in washington for so many years as legislators and working on important work and their names never bubbled to the top, why not? >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? you study similar topics but how did this book come about? it was my idea but i have been a political nerd -- my parents remember my sister and i 1960 staging a nixon/kennedy debate. my elephant beat her ravaged. during all of those years, what fascinated me were the magazine issues that came out in advance of the presidential election that we preview the eight or ten or 12, people who ought to be considered and it simply struck me after seeing so many issues of magazines that women were not being fought to the presidential. for some reason they were thought not to the presidential. as an academic you tend to ask why? that was the origin of the book. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> next, from aust
brown was not sworn in yet in massachusetts, and the url, scottbrown2012.com was already purchased. so many women had been in washington for so many years as legislatures and working on important work and, yet, their names never bubbled to the top, and we were curious why not? >> how did you decide that you wanted to write this book? i mean, all three of you studied similar topics, but how did the book actually come about? >> it was your idea, ted. >> ted? >> well, i guess it was my idea. i -- i've been a political nerd since i was, you know, i don't know, my parents still remember my sister and i in 1960 staging a nixon-kennedy debate with our stuffed animals. [laughter] my elephant beat her rabbit. [laughter] and during all of those years of nerdom -- [laughter] what always fascinated me were the magazine issues that would come out way in advance of a presidential election that would preview the eight or ten or 12 people who ought to be considered, and it simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues of so many magazines that women were not making it on to that list. they wer
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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